CPR Learning Center

CPR / AED / First Aid Training
Presented by Ken & Cheryl Brown, Certified Trainers for
American Heart Association" & "EMS Safety Services"

Frequently Asked Questions

If you don't find an answer here please contact us.

General Questions

I am coughing and sneezing from a cold. Should I go to the course?
No. Contact your Instructor to re-schedule the training date, so that others in the course are not infected.
I have an injury or disability and can't perform all the skills. Can I be certified?
No. CPR/AED and First Aid certification requires that students pass a written exam and a skills exam. Students who cannot perform the skills are not issued certification cards. However, a person with a disability can perform many of the skills as well as guide another rescuer through the steps. Even though a person may not be able to complete the certification requirements, the training is still highly valuable.
What is the minimum age for CPR, First Aid, or AED certification?
Because EMS Safety is an adult-education based course, the minimum recommended age for certification is 13 years old. However, if a student can understand the information and pass the written and skills testing, then he or she should be issued a certification card regardless of his or her age.

American Heart Association (AHA) FAQ's

Are workbooks required to take an American Heart Association course?
Yes, the AHA requires you to have the appropriate "current" textbook for each course. If you do not already have one or do not have access to one before, during, and after the class (like at a hospital), you will need to purchase one for the course.
What are the Heartsaver classroom courses?
The American Heart Association's core Heartsaver classroom courses, for those with little or no medical training, include Heartsaver First Aid, Heartsaver CPR AED and Heartsaver First Aid CPR AED. These videobased, Instructor-led courses teach participants critical skills needed to respond to and manage an emergency in the first few minutes until emergency medical services (EMS) takes over. Depending on the course, participants learn how to recognize, respond to and treat a variety of first aid emergencies, and perform CPR and use an AED in the event of a sudden cardiac arrest.
What is different about the 2011 Heartsaver classroom courses versus the 2006 classroom courses?

The 2011 Heartsaver classroom courses reflect the 2010 AHA Guidelines for CPR & ECC, published in October 2010. Other updates to the courses include:

  • Heartsaver CPR is no longer a stand-alone course; Heartsaver CPR AED replaces the 2006 versions of both Heartsaver CPR and Heartsaver AED
  • Heartsaver First Aid skills are now tested
  • Optional written test offered for those students whose employers require completion of a written test
  • All child and infant skills are included in optional modules
Why is Heartsaver CPR no longer offered as a stand-alone course (without AED instruction)?

The decision to eliminate the stand-alone Heartsaver CPR Course was based on science in the 2010 AHA Guidelines for CPR & ECC, which indicates that the chance of survival from sudden cardiac arrest is greater when high-quality CPR includes use of an AED. Science also shows that, with AEDs becoming more and more widely available in public and workplace settings, there is an increased need to educate all students on how to use an AED. Based on the science, all AHA adult and child CPR courses now will include AED instruction.

For detailed information on this science-based recommendation, please refer to Part 16: Education, Implementation and Teams of the 2010 AHA Guidelines for CPR & ECC (page S922).

Are the additional Heartsaver courses, Heartsaver Childcare First Aid, Heartsaver Bloodborne Pathogens and Heartsaver CPR in Schools also being updated?
Yes, plans for updating these courses to reflect 2010 AHA Guidelines science are in development. Once a timeline for updates to these courses and materials is determined, AHA will communicate timing to customers.
Specifically, what content is taught in the Heartsaver classroom courses?
All courses include key changes reflecting science from the 2010 AHA Guidelines for CPR & ECC. Each course also offers an optional written test for students whose employers require completion of a test. Specific content covered in each course is listed below:

Heartsaver CPR AED

  • Adult CPR AED (with a mask)
  • Adult choking
  • Optional modules include child CPR AED, and infant CPR, including child and infant choking

Heartsaver First Aid

  • First aid basics (including scene safety, finding the problem, calling for help and more)
  • Medical emergencies (including actions for choking, breathing problems, shock and more)
  • Injury emergencies (including actions for bleeding, broken bones, burns and more)
  • Environmental emergencies (including actions for bites and stings, and temperature-related and poison emergencies)

Heartsaver First Aid CPR AED

  • First aid basics (including scene safety, finding the problem, calling for help and more)
  • Medical emergencies (including actions for choking, breathing problems, shock and more)
  • Injury emergencies (including actions for bleeding, broken bones, burns and more)
  • Environmental emergencies (including actions for bites and stings, and temperature-related and poison emergencies)
  • Adult CPR AED (with a mask)
  • Optional modules include child CPR AED, and infant CPR, including child and infant choking
Who is the target audience for the Heartsaver classroom products and courses?
These courses are for anyone with limited or no medical training who needs a course completion card in first aid and/or CPR AED to meet job, regulatory or other requirements.
What is the format for the Heartsaver classroom courses?
Heartsaver courses teach skills using the AHA's research-proven Practice-While-Watching technique, which allows Instructors to observe students, provide feedback and guide students' acquisition of skills. These courses include skills practice and testing to ensure students demonstrate competency performing skills and have mastered knowledge of cognitive information.
Which skills are students tested on the Heartsaver classroom courses?
Skills tested for each course are listed below:

Heartsaver First Aid CPR AED

  • Taking off gloves
  • Finding the problem
  • Epinephrine pen use
  • Stopping bleeding
  • Adult CPR AED
  • Child CPR AED (when taught)
  • Infant CPR (when taught)

Heartsaver CPR AED

  • Adult CPR AED
  • Child CPR AED (when taught)
  • Infant CPR (when taught)

Heartsaver First Aid

  • Taking off gloves
  • Finding the problem
  • Epinephrine pen use
  • Stopping bleeding
Is there a written test that must be completed for Heartsaver courses?
While the AHA does not mandate completion of a written test for Heartsaver courses, an optional written test is available for Instructors to administer to students whose employers require completion of a written test.
Approximately how long do the Heartsaver classroom courses take to complete?

The following are the approximate completion times for each course. Times are based on a recommended ratio of 6 students to 2 manikins to 1 Instructor. Using a different ratio of students to manikins to Instructors will result in increased course completion times.

  • Heartsaver First Aid: approximately 2 – 3 hours
  • Heartsaver CPR AED: approximately 3 – 4 hours
  • Heartsaver First Aid CPR AED: approximately 5 – 7 hours
Does successful completion of the Heartsaver classroom courses result in receipt of an AHA course completion card? If so, what card?

Yes, students who successfully complete the requirements of these courses will receive an AHA course completion card, valid two years. The table below indicates the card received for each course:

Course Card Received
Heartsaver First Aid Heartsaver First Aid Course Completion Card
Heartsaver CPR AED Heartsaver CPR AED Course Completion Card
Heartsaver First Aid CPR AED Heartsaver First Aid CPR AED Course Completion Card

Are continuing education (CE/CME) credits offered for the Heartsaver classroom-based courses?
No, CE/CME credits are not offered for these classroom courses. Course Materials

EMA Safety Services FAQ's

Who needs CPR, First Aid, or AED training?
The Federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires many occupations to maintain current training in CPR and First Aid. Additionally, many employers want their employees trained, even if it's not required. Some industry examples include the following: construction workers/foremen, manufacturing, teachers and coaches, childcare employees, fitness trainers, lifeguards and boat captains, Emergency Response Team (ERT) members, church/community groups, healthcare workers and professional rescuers.
Are EMS Safety's CPR and First Aid programs OSHA compliant?
Yes. EMS Safety checks OSHA CPR, First Aid and Bloodborne Pathogen requirements regularly to ensure that our programs meet or exceed the standards. Although AED training is not currently required, it is recommended by OSHA.
How do EMS Safety's programs compare to others?
EMS Safety's programs follow the same guidelines as other national programs. What sets us apart are the quality, ease-of-use, and cost. Our programs are the best value in the industry.
Are there special rules for teaching daycare/childcare providers?

Yes, in some states. California is one of the most stringent and requires approval from the Emergency Medical Services Authority (EMSA). EMS Safety has a Childcare CPR and First Aid course that has been specifically designed for the daycare/childcare provider. EMS Safety's program is approved in California for daycare/childcare providers. See a list of our program approvals.

Washington State departments on the list include:

  • Washington Department of Social and Health Services, Division of Childcare and Early Learning
  • Washington Department of Health, Office of Emergency Medical and Trauma Prevention

How long has EMS Safety been around?
Over 15 years. EMS Safety was incorporated in 1993. We started in California and have grown nation-wide. Our programs are approved by numerous Federal, State and Private Organizations.
What EMS Safety course is right for me?
It depends on what you need. CPR Training typically covers care for adult, child and infant cardiac arrest and choking emergencies. First Aid Training teaches how to respond to medical emergencies (e.g. heart attack, stroke and diabetic emergencies), injury-related emergencies (e.g. bleeding and suspected fractures), and environmental emergencies (e.g. hot and cold emergencies and allergic reactions). AED Training combines instruction in adult/child CPR and choking care and the use of an Automated External Defibrillator (AED). Bloodborne Pathogens training is for responders and workers who are at risk for coming into contact with Bloodborne Pathogens. All of our courses are OSHA compliant.
How long is my certification good for?
Most certifications from EMS Safety are valid for two years. The exception is Bloodborne Pathogens training, which is valid for one year.
How do I recertify my training?
Contact your Instructor before your certification expires to arrange a recertification course, which takes less time. Recertification training only applies to currently certified providers. If your card is expired or if you cannot locate a recertification course in your area, you'll need to take the complete course again.
Am I covered by the Good Samaritan Law?
The Good Samaritan Law is different in every state. Most Good Samaritan Laws protect rescuers from civil liability as long as rescuers are responding voluntarily, stay within the scope of their training, do not cause harm to the victim, and stay with the victim until additional help arrives. Generally, trained rescuers are covered by the Good Samaritan Law as long as they meet the parameters above. Contact your local Emergency Medical Services Agency for more information about the Good Samaritan Law in your state.

CPR Learning Center: PO BOX 496 YELM, WA 98597
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